Friday, April 20, 2012

Your Reaction to A&E Intervention's Censorship over Unethical Conduct of Interventionist Donna Chavous

  1. Interventions based upon confrontation, hostility, name calling and surprise attacks are harmful and unethical! It is time for recovery advocates and professionals to stand up against Interventionists that use these tactics and recognize that we must all first DO NO HARM in our work. Promoting recovery is about helping people rebuild their lives by encouraging hope and optimism and all involved need to offer compassion, kindness and acceptance if they want to be part of the solution.
     
  2. Accountability is an absolute in our chosen field.
    I'm also not surprised...entertainment trumps therapy...ratings are everything.

    Peter B
    Aurora, Canada
     
  3. A&E is making money off peoples misery, plan and simple. And we are to be entertained by watching this? I guess they will do anything for a buck. The Florida drug courts with the help of the Marchman Act have been a responsible successful response to the growing problem of drug addiction. To see A&E sensationalize the process and exploit those in need of treatment for ratings is sickening.
     
  4. Shocking!!! I never liked that woman and now I know why!!!!
     
  5. A&E should be ashamed of itself. It's one thing to make a profit on exploiting those who suffer. It is quite another thing to knowingly promote a person who exacerbates the situation to the detriment of the suffering AND over the objections of experts in the field. Shame, shame, shame A&E. End the suffering NOW by taking this woman off the air!

  6. Although I have not seen the episode in question, I do have a good deal of experience with using the Marchman Act successfully. It is not a scare tactic, but a useful tool for terrified families and very ill addicts. The justice system of Florida have provided lawyers and skilled clinicians with this legal recourse for families who are hopeless. It is a shame that this interventionist used the Marchman Act in the way she allegedly has. Personally, I can no longer watch Intervention due to the negative effects, intended and unintended consequences that happen in most episodes.
    As a clinician, practicing in the state of Florida, I feel that the commercialization of addiction and recovery is ridiculous. It SUCKS that A&E is disregarding or ignoring Ray's expertise and advice.
    Addiction and Recovery is already shrouded in misunderstanding and ignorance, I fear that this show may only make things worse.

    Signed,
    Concerned Clinician in Florida
     
  7. Christopher I.Apr 18, 2012 03:51 PM
    I have been following this thing since I first saw the Episode and then read the article in the Huffington Post. I was encouraged, initially, that A&E was taking this situation seriously and had been waiting to hear that Ms Chavous had been properly reprimanded, and, at minimum, required to re-certify herself before continuing to act as an interventionist.

    I am absolutely appalled at A&E's change of attitude on this matter. It seems to me that they have opened themselves to all kinds of legal trouble and I hope that every ounce of that trouble now finds them.

    I, for one, will not be watching anything on A&E until I have heard they intend to take appropriate responsibility for Ms Chavous' actions. The show I took pleasure in supporting, because of the good I thought they were doing, has become willfully dangerous and recklessly irresponsible.

    Christopher I.
    Encino, CA
     
  8. Can anyone send the link to that episode?
     
  9. Dear Attorney Raymond G. Ferrero III,

    Thank you. As a Treatment provider, Advocate and person in Recovery for the past 18 years I applaud your recent post I just viewed on your Blog and also Addiction Professional Discussion Board about "Courtney's story"! I also want to see an immediate response and action by A & E for their failed promise to investigate Donna Chavous’ conduct.

    Although like you and others I do not expect it. With this being said, I had a thought to share with you. Since you have written Blogs which has brought attention to this matter and many in the recovery community have also voiced their concern I wonder if you should visit the website of "Change" ( http://www.change.org/ ) . This is a site that allows individuals to raise awareness to a topic and generate national media attention. I feel this would be a wonderful way to get "Courtney's Story" out to the public and the Recovery Community. This would serve to raise awareness and also provide the means to request everyone support the cause to hold A & E responsible for their actions and demand they take action to correct the harm they have inflicted!!!

    I hope you will consider my suggestion. I have seen the benefit this site has provided and recommend it highly. Thank you for your time.
    Sincerely, T.T. RN CMA
     
  10. Since I don't watch the show, I will rely on your thorough recap of the behavior of the interventionist. In a historical sense the intervention is a relic of the halcyon days of the medical model. At least from what I saw, treatment has greatly changed based in large part upon the work of William Miller and his associates in the development of Motivational Enhancement Therapy. For the better. Intervention used to be a patient finding strategy for inpatient programs, most of which went out of business by 1995. From your description of the Marchman Act, it seems to fill a gap we often saw here. However, making it easier to involuntarily commit substance abusers doesn't necessarily mean that intervention is the best way to get people help.

    JS, LPC, LMFT
     
  11. Although I have not seen this episode as well, I am astonished and terribly disturbed by this report. I believe from an ethical perspective, it is imperitive that councelor's recognize the impact of their ehtics,values and lack of interpersonal skills can negatively affect a client rather than help. We must remember "Cause No Harm"

    Kimberly, Canada
     
  12. Good job. That was my first thought - until there is public awareness of this - it will be brushed under the carpet....
    Posted by BM, LMSW
     
  13. Accountability is an absolute in our chosen field.
    I'm also not surprised...entertainment trumps therapy...ratings are everything.

    PB
    Aurora, Canada

  14. A&E is making money off peoples misery, plan and simple. And we are to be entertained by watching this? I guess they will do anything for a buck. The Florida drug courts with the help of the Marchman Act have been a responsible successful response to the growing problem of drug addiction. To see A&E sensationalize the process and exploit those in need of treatment for ratings is sickening.
     
  15. This maybe more of an opportunity than a problem! I read your open letter regarding A&E Intervention and agree with your perspective. I am a Chemical Dependency Counselor in Ohio which has recently passed new legislatoin creating a process for commiting addicts and alcoholics to treatment for thefirst time. It appears to be modeled after our exixting process for involuntary commitment of mentally ill. It occurs to me that your experiance in Florida could inform our process in Ohio.
     
  16. It's about time! I have been an addictions counselor for about 8 years, and I get great results because I NEVER tell the client what to do, nor do I ever use pressure or force of any kind. My success rate is often six or sevenfold that of other counselors in the same agency who just can't resist giving advice or using overly directive interventions.

    I will, no doubt, get slammed for this, especially by those whose wallets are getting fat from doing interventions, but I will say it anyway. Interventions are ALWAYS wrong! It is flatly inappropriate to stage what I call the "Nasty little surprise party." People stop when they are ready to stop and NOT before. I have worked with many, many clients who were the recipients of interventions, and in every case I have ever seen, even if there was a brief period of white knuckle sobriety, they not only went back to using, they went back with a vengeance, trying to make up for "lost time." My suggestion for every interventionist out there working right now is to get a copy of "Motivational Interviewing" by MIller & Rolnick, read it about three times and then get some training. You just cannot jump the shark on this step. Yes, maybe you stopped them on a downward spiral, but it's the other treatment counselors that get to deal with the wreckage you caused.
    Q: "Have you ever been the recipient of a home intervention?"
    A: "Oh, yeah. It was awesome -- got me sober and saved my life, man!"
    Q: "Yes, but I notice you're back in treatment again. How many times have you been back to inpatient treatment since the intervention?
    A: "Fourteen. But that intervention REALLY worked, man!"

    Sometimes they say 9 or 12, one guy had been through inpatient treatment again 17 times! Interventions evoke short term compliance, and in my experience, nothing more. They do, however, seem to evoke a chronic "revolving door" treatment patient.

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